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Career Center

The Voorhees College Career Center is dedicated to supporting your needs at all stages of the career process. We are here to support you in making decisions about your future direction, acquiring hands-on experiences, or help prepare you for the nest steps to live out your career goals.

Student Services

Exploring Major and Career options and writing your resume, to connecting with employers for internships and interviews. Voorhees College students have access to career coaching and online tools.

Employer Services

Voorhees College has exceptional qualified students and stellar academic programs, our recruiting tools and partner support make it easy to achieve your hiring goals.

Faculty Services

The Voorhees College Career Center welcomes every opportunity to present valuable career management information to your classes. Please schedule a time to visit us, or we will even come to you and your department with custom presentations.

Alumni Services

Numerous services offered to current students are also available to Voorhees College alumni. If you are in the early stages of your career or in the midst of a career change, we can help you reach your next level of success.

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Career Pathways Program Maps

Department of Business and Entrepreneurship

Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Katherine R. Whitaker, DBA

Department Chair of Business & Entrepreneurship

Assistant Professor of Business

St. James Building, Room 133

Office: (803) 780-1069

kwhitaker@voorhees.edu

Professor Alicia Davis

Department Chair of Business & Entrepreneurship

Assistant Professor of Business

St. James Building, Room 124

Office: (803) 780-1084

adavis@voorhees.edu

Program Specific Mathematics Placement
A minimum of 24 credit hours is required for a major in Accounting and maintain a minimum grade of “C” or better in all Core required courses.  
·
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Mathematics or College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab Physical Science General Chemistry I & Lab 4 GI ELECTIVE 4
CP 120 Career Pathways I 2
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
Total 17  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French 1 3  
BA 130 Introduction to Business 3  
HIST 133 World History Survey I 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 2  
CP 121 Career Pathways II 3  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
CBIS 231 Business Computer Applications 3  
SPCH 130 or SPCH 231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
ECON 231Principles of Economics I 3  
BA 230Business Ethics 4  
ACT 231 Principles of Accounting 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways III 2  
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
(GI Elective Select One) Global and Intercultural 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
ACT 232 Principles of Accounting II 3
ECON 232 Principles of Economics II 3
Free Elective 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
Total 17  
5th Semester CR Notes
FIN 331Business Finance 3
ACT 331Intermediate Acct I 3
MGT 331Principles of Management 3
ACT 333 Tax I 3
MKT 331 Principles of Marketing 3
CP 301 Career Pathways I 2
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
BA 330 Math for Business 3
Ba 332 Business Statistics 3
BA 338 Business Law 3
ACT 332 Intermediate Acct II 3
CP 302 Career Pathways 2
Total 14
7Th Semester CR Notes
ACT 337 Cost Accounting 3  
BA 431 Int’l Business 3
ACT 431 Auditing 3
ACT 435 Advanced Accounting 3
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
Total 14
8th Semester CR Notes
BA 432 Business Internship 3  
ACT 432 Accounting Info Systems 3  
MGT 434 Business Policy 3  
Free Elective 3  
CP 402 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
     

Please always check online at catalog at https://www.voorhees.edu/admissions/college-catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.

CAREER INFORMATION

Accountants have stable and rewarding careers. Accountants play a crucial role in the success of large corporations, small businesses, and government agencies around the world, which translates into consistently high demand and competitive salaries. If you’re considering an accounting career, you will need a strong aptitude for mathematics and analysis, as well as a good business sense and the ability to focus on details. An accounting degree opens the door to many attractive positions, and it can also serve as an important prerequisite for a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) certification and other advanced degrees and certifications.

Accounting ranks high on U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Jobs” List.

  • Best Business Jobs: #7
  • Best STEM Jobs: #8
  • The 100 Best Jobs: #36

Positions in the field

  • Corporate accountant
  • Forensic accountant
  • Corporate controller
  • Corporate auditor
  • Corporate tax manager
  • Corporate compliance analyst
  • Corporate financial or budget analyst
  • Financial reporting analyst
  • Public tax accountant
  • Public auditor

 Job Market Forecast.

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that demand for accountants and auditors will remain strong through 2026, with growth that outpaces other careers in the financial sector and the average for all occupations. To some extent, this growth will be linked to the overall economy. As companies grow and go public, they will need more accounting professionals to handle complex financial documentation. In addition, a trend toward stricter laws, new regulations, and tighter lending standards will drive the need for more accounting and auditing services.

Work environment.

The 1.4 million accounting and auditing professionals in the United States work for an incredibly diverse range of organizations across virtually every industry—from giant public accounting firms and multi-national corporations to government agencies and small businesses. As a result, the hours and types of work environments can vary greatly, depending on the specialty you decide to pursue and the type of firm you work for. Most accountants work in offices, although working from home may also be an option for some. Accounting and auditing work tends to be somewhat solitary, although many accountants are also active members of functional and cross-functional teams. In 2016, about one in five accountants worked more than 40 hours per week, and many accountants are expected to work extra hours during tax season or near the end of their employer’s budget year.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the following industries employed the largest number of accountants in 2016:

  • Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, and Payroll Services: 353,400
  • Management of Companies: 94,000
  • Government: 116,300
  • Finance and Insurance: 114,500

Professional organizations.

Accounting is a popular career with a robust network of professional organizations. Explore these resources to get a better sense for the profession—and gain valuable insights into whether a bachelor’s degree in accounting is right for you.

Job Search Resources

Are you curious about the latest accounting career job openings? Check out these resources for an up-close look at some of the opportunities that are available today.

Salary Stats

  • Thanks to consistently high demand, accountant salariesare rising quickly. In May 2017, the average annual salary for accountants and auditors was $69,350, up from around $60,000 in 2006. Accounting positions also provide excellent opportunities for career advancement and salary growth, with opportunities to move into Financial Management positions and other executive roles.
Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Katherine R. Whitaker, DBA

Department Chair of Business & Entrepreneurship

Assistant Professor of Business

St. James Building, Room 133

Office: (803) 780-1069

kwhitaker@voorhees.edu

 
Program Specific Mathematics Placement
A minimum of 18 credit hours is required for a minor in Accounting and maintain a minimum grade of “C” or better in all Core required courses.  
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Mathematics or College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab Physical Science General Chemistry I & Lab 4 GI ELECTIVE 4
CP 120 Career Pathways I 2
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
Total 17  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French 1 3  
BA 130 Intro to Business 3  
HIST 133 World History Survey I 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 2  
CP 121 Career Pathways II 3  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
CBIS 231 Business Computer Applications 3  
SPCH 130 or SPCH 231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
ECON 231Principles of Economics I 3  
BA 230 Business Ethics 4  
ACT 231 Principles of Accounting 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways III 2  
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
(GI Elective Select One) Global and Intercultural 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
ACT 232 Principles of Accounting II 3
ECON 232 Principles of Economics II 3
Free Elective 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
Total 17  
5th Semester CR Notes
FIN 331 Business Finance 3
FIN 333 Investments 3
MGT 331 Principles of Management 3
MGT 337 Pro/Quant Meth in Bus 3
MKT 331 Principles of Marketing 3
CP 301 Career Pathways I 2
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
BA 330 Math for Business 3
BA 332 Business Statistics 3
BA 338 Business Law 3
MGT 332 Organizational Behavior 3
FIN 332 Corporate Finance  
CP 302 Career Pathways 2
Total 14
7Th Semester CR Notes
MKT 332 Prin of Advertisement 3  
BA 431 Int’l Business 3
FIN 336 Fin Options & Futures OR

FIN 430 Fin Markets & Institutions

3
MGT 333 Human Resource Management 3
CP 401 Career Pathways 1
Total 13

 

8th Semester CR Notes
BA 432 Business Internship 3  
MGT 432 Small Bus MGT OR

MKT 335 Retailing

3  
MGT 434 Business Policy 3  
Free Elective 3  
CP 402 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
     

Please always check online at catalog at https://www.voorhees.edu/admissions/college-catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.

CAREER INFORMATION

A Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree is designed to provide students with a strong academic foundation in core business functions including general business administration, accounting, finance, project management, information technology, human resources, marketing, international business, logistics and organizational behavior.

Possible Career Paths with a Business Administration Degree

  • Sales Managers
    Management of Companies and Enterprises
    Car Dealers
    Wholesale Electronic Markets
    Computer Systems Design
    Department Stores
  • Financial Managers
    Depository Credit Intermediation
    Management of Companies
    Accounting, Tax Prep, Bookkeeping and Payroll Services
    Insurance Companies
    Local Government
  • HR Management
    Management of Companies
    Local Government
    Hospitals
    Employment Services
    Computer Systems Design
  • Marketing Management
    Management of Companies
    Computer Systems Design
    Management, Scientific and Technical Consulting
    Insurance Companies
    Advertising and Public Relations

Salary Stats

Business Administration Career                         Median Annual Salary*

Sales Management                                                   $117,960

Financial Management                                            $121,750

Human Resources Management                         $106,910

Food Service Management                                    $50,820

Health Care Administration                                   $83,810

Marketing Management                                         $131,180

 Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2018-19 Occupational Outlook Handbook

*The salary information listed is based on a national average, unless noted. Actual salaries may vary greatly based on specialization within the field, location, years of experience and a variety of other factors. National long-term projections of employment growth may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions and do not guarantee actual job growth.

Job Market Forecast.

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that demand for employees with a degree in business administration will remain strong through 2026. The latest technology invention becomes old news in approximately two months. Yet businesses will continue to require and use leaders with the right kind of education and training. That’s where a business administration degree may come in handy.

Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Katherine R. Whitaker, DBA

Department Chair of Business & Entrepreneurship

Assistant Professor of Business

St. James Building, Room 133

Office: (803) 780-1069

kwhitaker@voorhees.edu

James Ross, MBA

Department Chair of Business & Entrepreneurship

Assistant Professor of Business

St. James Building, Room 126

Office: (803) 780-1087

jross@voorhees.edu

Program Specific Mathematics Placement
A minimum of 18 credit hours is required for a minor in Finance and maintain a minimum grade of “C” or better in all Core required courses.  
·
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Mathematics or College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab Physical Science General Chemistry I & Lab 4 GI ELECTIVE 4
CP 120 Career Pathways I 2
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
Total 17  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French 1 3  
BA 130 Intro to Business 3  
HIST 133 World History Survey I 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 2  
CP 121 Career Pathways II 3  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
CBIS 231 Business Computer Applications 3  
SPCH 130 or SPCH 231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
ECON 231Principles of Economics I 3  
BA 230 Business Ethics 4  
ACT 231 Principles of Accounting 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways III 2  
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
(GI Elective Select One) Global and Intercultural 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
ACT 232 Principles of Accounting II 3
ECON 232 Principles of Economics II 3
Free Elective 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
Total 17  
5th Semester CR Notes
FIN 331 Business Finance 3
FIN 333 Investments 3
MGT 331 Principles of Management 3
MGT 337 Prod/Quant Meth in Bus 3
MKT 331 Principles of Marketing 3
CP 301 Career Pathways I 2
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
BA 330 Math for Business 3
Ba 332 Business Statistics 3
FIN 336 Fin Options & Futures 3
MGT 332 Organizational Behavior 3
FIN 332 Cooperate Finance
CP 302 Career Pathways 2
Total 14
7Th Semester CR Notes
Principle of Advertisement 3  
BA 431 Int’l Business 3
FIN 336 or FIN 430 Financial Options & Futures or Markets & Institutions 3
MGT 333 Human Resource Management 3
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
Total 14
8th Semester CR Notes
BA 432 Business Internship 3  
MGT 432 Or MKT 335 Small Business Management or Retailing 3  
MGT 434 Business Policy 3  
Free Elective 3  
CP 402 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
     

Please always check online at catalog at https://www.voorhees.edu/admissions/college-catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.

Career Information

In the field of finance, there are three main categories of the industry: public, corporate, and personal. From financial planning to investment banking to insurance, people who pursue careers in finance power the world.

Careers in finance are often a popular choice in that they can offer a high paying position shortly after completing your degree. The different opportunities for working within the finance field are vast, with a multitude of specialties to choose from.

  • Positions in the field:
  • Commercial Banking
  • Investment Banking
  • Financial Planner
  • Insurance Agent
  • Public Accounting
  • Hedge Fund Manager
  • Venture Capitalist
  • Real Estate Agent
  • Chief Financial Officer
  • Salaries for Finance Jobs

Professional Organizations:

Salary Stats

One of the most popular aspects about entering into the finance world is the ability to obtain a job quickly, depending on your degree, and receiving a high-paying salary. Depending on the position within the finance field you choose, your salary will differ. Listed below are some finance jobs and their average salaries:

Finance Job Title           Average Salary                        

Commercial Banking     $92,983

Investment Banking      $96,543

Financial Planner           $61,830

Insurance Agent            $37,667

Public Accounting         $63,907

Hedge Funds Manager  $70,000

Venture Capitalist         $92,406

Real Estate Agent          $59,180

Chief Financial Officer   $128,468

Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Katherine R. Whitaker, DBA

Department Chair of Business & Entrepreneurship

Assistant Professor of Business

St. James Building, Room 133

Office: (803) 780-1069

kwhitaker@voorhees.edu

 
Program Specific Mathematics Placement
A minimum of 18 credit hours is required for a minor in Accounting and maintain a minimum grade of “C” or better in all Core required courses.  
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Mathematics or College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab Physical Science General Chemistry I & Lab 4 GI ELECTIVE 4
CP 120 Career Pathways I 2
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
Total 17  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French 1 3  
BA 130 Intro to Business 3  
HIST 133 World History Survey I 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 2  
CP 121 Career Pathways II 3  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
CBIS 231 Business Computer Applications 3  
SPCH 130 or SPCH 231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
ECON 231Principles of Economics I 3  
BA 230 Business Ethics 4  
ACT 231 Principles of Accounting I 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways III 2  
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
(GI Elective Select One) Global and Intercultural 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
ACT 232 Principles of Accounting II 3
ECON 232 Principles of Economics II 3
BA 231 – Entrepreneurship 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
Total 17  
5th Semester CR Notes
BA 330 Math for Business 3
FIN 333 Investments 3
MGT 331 Principles of Management 3
MGT 337 Pro/Quant Meth in Bus 3
MKT 331 Principles of Marketing 3
CP 301 Career Pathways I 2
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
BA 340 – Franchising 3
BA 332 Business Statistics 3
BA 338 Business Law 3
MGT 335 – Product Development 3
BA 341 – Innovation & Entrepreneurship 3
CP 302 Career Pathways 2
Total 17
7Th Semester CR Notes
BA 400 – Technology for Entrepreneurs 3  
BA 431 Int’l Business 3
Free Elective 3
MGT 333 Human Resource Management 3
CP 401 Career Pathways 1
Total 13

 

8th Semester CR Notes
BA 432 Business Internship 3  
MGT 432 Small Bus MGT 3  
MGT 434 Business Policy 3  
FIN 435 Entrepreneurial Finance 3  
CP 402 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
     

Please always check online at catalog at https://www.voorhees.edu/admissions/college-catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.

CAREER INFORMATION

Students who pursue a degree in Business Administration and select the entrepreneurship concentration have a number of career options available to them.  This concentration prepares students with the necessary tools to start their own business as an entrepreneur in a wide variety of fields. Students may wish to begin their career in finance, sales, marketing, or public relations, to name a few options. Some possible choices are listed below:

  • Business Owner/Founder
  • Investment Banker
  • Marketing Manager or Executive
  • Product Development Manager
  • Venture Capitalist

Department of Humanities, Education, and Social Sciences

Child Development Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information

Tywana L. Chenault, Ph.D.

Department Chair of Humanities, Education, and Social Science

Associate Professor of Psychology

Matthew M. Goldson Fines Arts and Humanities Building, Room 101

Office:  (803) 780-1079

Faculty Advisor Information

Pamela Small

Department: Humanities, Education and Social Science

Assistant Professor of Child Development

Humanities Building Room 109

Office: (803) 780-1171

Program Specific  Placement
A minimum grade of “C” is required in all child Development Courses  
·       Developmental Courses (will not count towards graduation)

·       Students who purse a major in Child Development must enroll in 40-hour general education courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C” or better must be earned in all Child Development Courses

SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3 *pre-req for ENG 132
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130, Physical 130 or Chemical 141 (Science & Lab) 4
CP 120 Career Pathways I 2
CMP 130 C 3
Total 17  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3  
CP 121 Career Pathways II 2  
CD 100 Introduction to Early Childhood 3  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
EDU 234 Technology in the Classroom 3  
EDU 230 History  & Philosophy  of Education 3  
CD 200 Parent Education and Guidance 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3 *Pre-req for SPAN 132 or FREN 132
EDU 232 Child Growth & Development 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways I 2 Practicum I
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
EDU 235 Literature for Children 3  
SPCH 130 or SPCH 231- Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3
CD 201 Health Nutrition & Safety for Young Children 3
CP 202 Career Pathways II 2
Non-Restricted-1 3 Non –Restrictive Elective
Total 14  
5th Semester CR Notes
EDU 341 Educational Psychology 3
CD 301 Developmentally Appropriate Practice for Infants & Young Children 3 Practicum II
CD 302 Observation & Assessment of Young Children 3
CD 303 Early Literature and Language Development 3 Practicum III
CP 301 Career Pathways I 2
EDU 330 Art for Children 2
Total 16  
6th Semester CR Notes
CD 304 Child, family and Community Relations 3
CD 305 Play and Learning for the Preschool Child 3 Practicum IV
EDU 329 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3
EDU 331 Music for Children 2
CP 302 Career Pathways II 2
Total 13  
7Th Semester CR Notes
CD 402 Childcare Administration 3
Non-Restricted 2 3 Restrictive Elective
EDU 342 Classroom Management 3
GI ELECTIVE (See Chart) Global and Intercultural Elective 3
CP 401 Career Pathways I 3
Total 15  
8th Semester CR Notes
Non-Restricted 3 3 Restrictive Elective
Free Elective 3  
Non-Restricted 4 3 Restrictive Elective
CP 402 Career Pathways II 3  
Free Elective 4 Free Elective
Total 16  

Careers for Child Development Graduates

THE undergraduate degree in child development have several career options within both public and private institutions. Among the options upon graduation and optional certification are:

  • Child Development Family Advocate
  • Early Childhood Teacher
  • Early Childhood Consultant
  • Child Life Specialist
  • Parent Educator
  • Child Development Paraprofessional
  • Head Start teaching or leadership positions
  • Pre-school education jobs
  • Daycare education and management positions
  • Nanning and private daycare services
  • Curriculum specialist
  • Child development educator or specialist

Job Outlook

Childcare Workers

Percent change in employment, projected 2018-28

Other personal care and service workers

22%

Total, all occupations

5%

Childcare workers

2%

Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Employment of childcare workers is projected to grow 2 percent from 2018 to 2028, slower than the average for all occupations.

Parents or guardians who work will continue to need the assistance of childcare workers. In addition, the demand for preschools and childcare facilities, and consequently childcare workers, should remain strong because early childhood education is widely recognized as important for a child’s intellectual and emotional development.

However, the increasing cost of childcare may reduce demand for childcare workers.

Job Prospects

Despite limited employment growth, about 177,900 openings for childcare workers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

Most of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who exit the labor force, such as to retire, and from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations.

Workers who attain the Child Development Associate credential should have the best job prospects.

Employment projections data for childcare workers, 2018-28
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2018 Projected Employment, 2028 Change, 2018-28 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric
SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Pay

Childcare Workers

Median hourly wages, May 2018

Total, all occupations

$18.58

Other personal care and service workers

$11.70

Childcare workers

$11.17

Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics

The median hourly wage for childcare workers was $11.17 in May 2018. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $8.53, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $16.55.

In May 2018, the median hourly wages for childcare workers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Elementary and secondary schools; local $12.39
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 10.70
Child day care services 10.57

Pay varies with the worker’s education level and work setting. Those in formal childcare settings and those with more education usually earn higher wages. Pay for self-employed workers is based on the number of hours they work and the number and ages of children in their care.

Childcare workers’ schedules vary, and part-time work is common.

Childcare centers usually are open year round, with long hours so that parents or guardians can drop off and pick up their children before and after work. Some centers employ full-time and part-time staff with staggered shifts to cover the entire day.

Family childcare providers may work long or irregular hours to fit parents’ work schedules. In some cases, these childcare providers may offer evening and overnight care to meet the needs of families. After the children go home, childcare providers often have more responsibilities, such as shopping for food or supplies, keeping records, and cleaning.

Nannies work either full or part time. Full-time nannies may work more than 40 hours a week to cover parents’ commuting time to and from work

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/childcare-workers.htm#tab-5

Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers

Job Outlook

Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers

Percent change in employment, projected 2018-28

Total, all occupations

5%

Preschool, primary, secondary, and special education school teachers

4%

Kindergarten teachers, except special education

4%

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers

3%

Elementary school teachers, except special education

3%

Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Overall employment of kindergarten and elementary school teachers is projected to grow 3 percent from 2018 to 2028, slower than the average for all occupations. Rising student enrollment should increase demand for kindergarten and elementary teachers, but employment growth will vary by region.

The number of students enrolling in public kindergarten and elementary schools is expected to increase over the coming decade, and the number of classes needed to accommodate these students should rise. As a result, more teachers will be needed to teach public kindergarten and elementary school students.

Despite expected increases in enrollment in public schools, employment growth for kindergarten and elementary school teachers will depend on state and local government budgets. If state and local governments experience budget deficits, they may lay off employees, including teachers. As a result, employment growth of public kindergarten and elementary school teachers may be somewhat reduced.

Job Prospects

Some teachers are expected to reach retirement age over the coming decade. Their retirements may increase the need to replace workers who leave the occupation.

Opportunities will vary by region and school setting. There will be better opportunities in urban and rural school districts than in suburban school districts. Flexibility in job location may increase prospects.

Employment projections data for kindergarten and elementary school teachers, 2018-28
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2018 Projected Employment, 2028 Change, 2018-28 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric
SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program
Kindergarten and elementary school teachers 1,569,000 1,622,000 3 53,100
Kindergarten teachers, except special education 25-2012 134,500 139,700 4 5,100 Get data
Elementary school teachers, except special education 25-2021 1,434,400 1,482,400 3 47,900 Get data

Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers

Median annual wages, May 2018

Elementary school teachers, except special education

$58,230

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers

$57,980

Preschool, primary, secondary, and special education school teachers

$56,790

Kindergarten teachers, except special education

$55,470

Total, all occupations

$38,640

Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics

The median annual wage for elementary school teachers, except special education was $58,230 in May 2018. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $37,780, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $95,270.

The median annual wage for kindergarten teachers, except special education was $55,470 in May 2018. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $35,680, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $86,310.

In May 2018, the median annual wages for elementary school teachers, except special education in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Elementary and secondary schools; local $59,420
Elementary and secondary schools; private 46,410

In May 2018, the median annual wages for kindergarten teachers, except special education in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Elementary and secondary schools; local $57,270
Elementary and secondary schools; private 46,350
Child day care services 29,860

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers generally work during school hours when students are present. They may meet with parents, students, and other teachers before and after school. They often spend time in the evenings and on weekends grading papers and preparing lessons.

Many kindergarten and elementary school teachers work the traditional 10-month school year and have a 2-month break during the summer. They also have a short midwinter break. Some teachers work during the summer.

Teachers in districts with a year-round schedule typically work 9 weeks in a row and then have a break for 3 weeks before starting a new school session.

Professional/ College Student Organizations

Early Childhood Membership Associations

Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI)

ACEI is a global community of educators and advocates who unite knowledge, experience, and perspectives in order to exchange information, explore innovation, and advocate for children. The Association promotes and supports the optimal education and development of children, from birth through early adolescence, and the professional growth of educators and others committed to the needs of children in a changing society.

Child Care Aware of America

Child Care Aware is the national network of more than 700 child care resource and referral centers located in every state and most communities across the U.S. These centers help families, child care providers, and communities find, provide, and plan for affordable, quality child care.

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), Division for Early Childhood (DEC)

CEC is an international organization dedicated to improving educational outcomes for individuals with exceptionalities, students with disabilities, and/or those who are gifted. DEC is the Division of CEC that focuses on young children (birth through age 8) who have or are at risk for developmental delays and disabilities.

HighScope Educational Research Foundation
HighScope is an independent nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, established in 1970 with headquarters in Ypsilanti, Michigan. HighScope works to create and deliver high-quality educational resources, including professional learning workshops, assessment instruments, curriculum materials, and evaluation services to improve educational outcomes for children, families and communities. HighScope publishes many resources that support early childhood educators in their continued learning about best practices and the latest research in the early childhood field and by taking advantage of all the benefits of the HighScope Membership Association teachers interested in the CDA Credential will receive a wide variety of high quality early educational resources that benefit teachers, administrators, students, parents, and advocates who work to create positive lifetime benefits for children, families and communities.

Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC)
The Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC) is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit, world-wide organization. A model of positive leadership and advocacy, the MCEC’s work is focused on ensuring quality educational opportunities for all military-connected children affected by mobility, family separation, and transition. The MCEC performs research, develops resources, conducts professional institutes and conferences, and publishes resources for all constituencies.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

NAEYC is dedicated to improving the well-being of all young children, with particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age 8. The Association administers a voluntary, national accreditation system for high-quality early childhood programs, sponsors a variety of initiatives to improve professional preparation of early childhood educators, and produces a wide array of early childhood resources. NAEYC membership provides participation in both national and local services through the Association’s network of over 300 local, state, and regional Affiliates.

 National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC)

NAFCC is dedicated to promoting quality child care by strengthening the profession of family child care. NAFCC provides technical assistance to family child care associations by promoting leadership development and by promoting quality and professionalism through the organization’s accreditation process for family child care providers.

National Black Child Development Institute (NBCDI)

NBCDI provides and supports programs, workshops, and resources for African American children, their parents and communities in early health and education, health, elementary and secondary education, child welfare, and parenting. Affiliate chapters in many regions of the country provide direct services at the community level.

National Head Start Association (NHSA)

NHSA is dedicated to meeting the needs of Head Start children and their families. The Association provides support for the Head Start community by advocating for policies to strengthen Head Start services; providing training and professional development to Head Start staff; and developing and disseminating research, information, and resources that enrich Head Start program delivery.

World Organization for Early Childhood Education-United States National Committee (OMEP-USNC)

OMEP is the only worldwide non-governmental organization that focuses on education and welfare of young children, aged from birth to 8. OMEP assists any undertaking to improve early childhood education, and supports scientific research that can influence these conditions. The USNC works to educate its members and the public about issues relating to young children throughout the world.

ZERO TO THREE

ZERO TO THREE’s mission is to support the healthy development and well-being of infants, toddlers and their families. This multidisciplinary organization advances its mission by informing, educating, and supporting adults who influence the lives of infants and toddlers.

Research and Information Links for Early Childhood Career

National Institute for Early Education Research:  http://nieer.org/

National Association for the Education of Young Children:       https://www.naeyc.org/resources/topics/research

Benefits of Early Childhood Education

https://www.ffyf.org/new-harvard-study-reveals-lasting-benefits-quality-early-childhood-education/

Criminal Justice Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information

Tywana L. Chenault, Ph.D.

Department Chair of Humanities, Education, and Social Science

Associate Professor of Psychology

Matthew M. Goldson Fines Arts and Humanities Building, Room 101

Office:  (803) 780-1079

Louis Howell Jr., Ph.D.

Interim Coordinator of Criminal Justice

Bedford Hall. Room 5

Office: (803) 780-1099

lhowell@voorhees.edu

Program Specific Mathematics Placement
English Proficiency Exam (EPE) must be completed by …(list the EPE requirements here)

A minimum grade of “C” is required in all mathematics, physics, and computer science courses and all 400-level courses that are used to fulfill the computer science program.

 
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3 *pre-req for ENG 132
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3 *MATH 131 pre-req for Physics I
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO142 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab, Physical Science, General Chemistry I & Lab 4 *Pre-req for BIO 341, BIO 442
CP 120 Career Pathways I 2
Total 14  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3  
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3  
CP Career Pathways II 2  
Total 14  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I MATH 231 Pre-Calculus I 3 *Pre-req for SPAN 132 or FREN 132
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3  
SS 231 Amer National Gov 3  
CJ Into to Crim Justice 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways I 2  
GI Elective Global and Interlectual Elective 3  
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SPAN 132 or FREN 132 Elem Span I or Fren I 3  
SPCH 130 or SPCH 231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3
GEOG 230 World Geography 3
CP 202 Career Pathways II 2
Restricted I Select Course (Track I, II, or III) 3
Total 16  
5th Semester CR Notes
CJ 331 Criminal Law 3
SOCJ Criminology 3
SS Social Statistics 3
CJ 332 Amer Correct System 3
CP 301 Career Pathways I 2
Restricted 2 Select Courses (Track I, II, or III) 3
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
CJ 333 The Police System 3
CJ 334 Probat & Parole System 3
Restricted 3 Select Course (Track I,II, or III) 3
SS 332 Research Methods 3
CP 302 Career Pathways II 2
Total 14  
7Th Semester CR Notes
Restricted 4 Select Course (Track I,II, or III) 3
SOCJ 431  Juvenile Delinquency 3
SS 433 Ethics in Soc Sci 3
CP 401 (HESS) Career Pathways I (Major Research) 1
SS 440 Sen Capstone Sem 3
Total 13  
8th Semester CR Notes
CJ 432 Court System 3  
SS 435 Social Science Internship 3  
CP 402 (HESS) Career Pathways II (Major Research) 2  
Restricted 5 Select Course (Track I,II, or III) 3  
U.S. Constitution 3
Total 14  

Criminal Justice

The goals of the Criminal Justice major are to:

  1. Prepare graduates to meet the demands of the 21st century in the field of Criminal Justice, by making sure students are aware of the issues, concepts, philosophies and theories in criminal justice through quality instruction by continuing to strengthen teaching and student learning in the major.
  2. Prepare students to pursue advanced studies or a career in Criminal Justice and/or related professions such as Public Administration, Political Science, Sociology, and Law.

Program Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of current issues, concepts, philosophies and theories in the field of Criminal Justice;
  2. Write a research paper using electronic and non-electronic sources with appropriate documentation;
  3. Demonstrate the ability to speak as well as write cogently, effectively, and suitably as it relates to various subject matter;
  4. Demonstrate a commitment to community service; and

Apply knowledge of ethical principles to the high standards expected of criminal justice practitioners, as well as, demonstrate values that promote self-worth, harmonious behavior and interaction, selfreliance, empathy, and tolerance for others.

A Major in Criminal Justice Requires:

General Education 44

Social Science Core 24

Criminal Justice Core 37

Selected Track Electives 15

TOTAL 120

  • Students are eligible for Certificate in Criminal Justice upon completion of 32 CJ credit hours.
  • Track III Certificate in Emergency Management embedded in EM courses.

                                                                         Criminal Justice Tracks

                                                                                    Select One

Track I: Law Enforcement

              (15 hrs)

PSY 230 General Psychology

CJ 431 Private Security

CJ 435 Criminal Procedures

SOCJ 435 Deviant Behavior

EM 101 Intro. to Emerg Mang

Track II: Criminology

          (15 hrs.)

PSY 230 General sychology

SOCJ 435 Deviant Behavior

SOC 432 Social Problems

SOC 335 The Family

SOC 337 Racial & Ethnic Rel

Track III: Emergency Management

                     (15 hrs.)

EM 101 Intro. to Emerg Mang

EM 201 Risk and Vulnerability

EM 301 Emergency Planning

EM 360 Terrorism in the Mod Wr

PSY XXX Environmental Psy

HUMANITIES, INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES AND FINE ARTS  Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Tywana L. Chenault, Ph.D.

Department Chair of Humanities, Education, and Social Science

Associate Professor of Psychology

Matthew M. Goldson Fines Arts and Humanities Building, Room 101

Office:  (803) 780-1079

tchenault@voorhees.edu

Norma F. Watts  Ph.D

Department-HESS

Assistant Professor of Humanities/Interdisciplinary Studies and Fine Arts

Humanities Building-Room 100

Office:  (803) 780-1080

nwatts@voorhees.edu

 

Program Specific Humanities Placement
HUMANITIES :

Mass Communication Major

Sociology Major

Child Development Major

Criminal Justice Major

Psychology Major

Interdisciplinary Studies Major

Theological Studies Major

 
The following are Humanities courses, some of  which are required  or may be used Electives (or Independent Study) for each of the above majors
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
SPCH 130-Introduction to Communication 3
CP 120-Career Pathways I 2
ART 220-Art Appreciation 2
HUM 220-Introduction to Humanities 3
Total  
2nd Semester CR Notes
CP 121-Career Pathways II 2  
SPCH 231-Public Speaking 3  
 MUS 220-Music Appreciation 3  
AAS 230-Introduction to African American Studies 3  
   
Total  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
EDU 330-Art for Children 2  
CP 201-Career Pathways 2  
   
AAS 235-Blacks in American Society 3  
SPCH 231-Advanced Speech 3  
   
Total  
4th Semester CR. Notes
EDU 331-Music for Children 2  
HUM 221-Introduction to Film (?) pending 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
   
Total  
5th Semester CR Notes
INDS 400-Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies 3
INDS 401-Career Pathways and Applied Concepts of Interdisciplinary Studies 3
INDS 402-Research in Interdisciplinary Studies 3
CP 201 Career Pathways               2
Total  
6th Semester CR Notes
HIST 236—Survey of Civil Rights Movement 4
 
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
Total  
7Th Semester CR Notes
INDS 403-Capstone Experience-Senior Thesis 4
MCM 431-Senior Seminar I 3
Total  
8th Semester CR Notes
   
-MCM 432-Senior Seminar II 4  
 
 
Total  
Psychology Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Tywana L. Chenault, Ph.D.

Department Chair of Humanities, Education, and Social Science

Associate Professor of Psychology

Matthew M. Goldson Fines Arts and Humanities Building, Room 101

Office:  (803) 780-1079

tchenault@voorhees.edu

Tywana L. Chenault, Ph.D.

Department Chair of Humanities, Education, and Social Science

Associate Professor of Psychology

Matthew M. Goldson Fines Arts and Humanities Building, Room 101

Office:  (803) 780-1079

tchenault@voorhees.edu

Program Specific Mathematics Placement
A passing grade of is required in all general education requirements. The General Education 44-hour curriculum is applicable to the Psychology major.    
·       Developmental Courses (will not count towards graduation)

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132

·       A maximum of one letter grade of “D” is allowed in core psychology courses

SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3 *pre-req for ENG 132
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3 *MATH 131 pre-req for Physics I
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab, Physical Science, General Chemistry I & Lab 4 *Pre-req for BIO 341, BIO 442
CP 120 Career Pathways I 2
CMP 130 Computer Concepts 3
Total 17  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3  
CP 121 Career Pathways II 2  
Total 14  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
PSY 101 Hist and Systems of Psy 3  
FREE ELECTIVE Free Elective 3  
GI ELECTIVE Global and Intercultural Elective 3  
SPAN131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3 *Pre-req for SPAN 132 or FREN 132
GEO 230 World Geography 3  
SPCH 130 or SPCH 231 Intro to Communications of Public Speaking 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways I 2  
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
HIST 234 or AAS 230  AAS 230

Amer & African Amer Hist I or Intro to African Amer Stud.

3  
Restrictive Elective 3
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3
PSY 252 Cross-Cultural Pscyh 3
PSY 230 General Psychology 3
CP 202 Career Pathways II 2
Total 17  
5th Semester CR Notes
Free Elective 3
SS 332 Research Methods 3
PSY 331 Human Growth and Dev 3 Pre-req for
Restricted Elective 3
Free Elective 3
CP 301 Career Pathways I 2
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
SS 331 Social Statistics 3
PSY 350 Theories of Personality 3
PSY 360 Social Psychology 3
FREE ELECTIVE 3
CP 302 Career Pathways II 2
Total 14  
7Th Semester CR Notes
PSY 380 Testing Measurements 3
PSY 365 Learning Memory 3
PSY 370 Cognitive Psychology 3
PSY 450 or SS 433 Ethics 3
Restrictive 3
CP 401 Career Pathways I 3
Total 18  
8th Semester CR Notes
PSY 390 Sensation and Perception 3  
PSY 434 Psychology of Sub Abuse 3  
PSY 462 Psych of the African-American Experience 2  
PSY 460 Psychological Internship 3  
CP 402 Career Pathways II 2  
Elective 3
Total 16  

Job Market Forecast

The psychologist job outlook is expected to be stronger than the average over the next decade, which is perhaps why psychology has become one of the most popular majors at universities throughout the United States, ranking in the top five degrees awarded at many schools. The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that the demand for psychologists will grow at a rate of 14 percent over the next decade, which is faster than the average for all careers. Between 2016 and 2026, an estimated 23,000 psychologist jobs will be added to the U.S. economy.

Work environment

Career options utilize communication, interpersonal, and human behavior knowledge that psychology majors acquire during their undergraduate studies.

 

Professional/College student Organizations

American Psychology Association

Association of Educational Therapists

Psi Chi

National Association of African-American Psychologist

Career information

Career options utilize communication, interpersonal, and human behavior knowledge that psychology majors acquire during their undergraduate studies.

Psychologist (Educational, Industrial Organizational, Sport, Forensic, Experimental)

Psychometrist/Clinician

Substance Abuse Counselor

Sales Representatives

Advertising Agents

Psychiatric Technicians

Counselors

Probation and Parole Officer

Market Researcher

Teacher

Sociology Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration:
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Tywana L. Chenault, Ph.D.

Department Chair of Humanities, Education, and Social Science

Associate Professor of Psychology

Matthew M. Goldson Fines Arts and Humanities Building, Room 101

Office:  (803) 780-1079

tchenault@voorhees.edu

Alex Miller, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Bradford, Room 4

Office:  (803) 780-1161

amiller@voorhees.edu

Program Specific Mathematics Placement
English Proficiency Exam (EPE) must be completed

Students enrolled in ENG 122 or ENG 132 must maintain the minimum grade of “C” in course work and make a score of “3”, comparable to the grade of “C”, on the English Proficiency Examination (EPE) in order to pass ENG 122 or ENG 132. The EPE is required of all Voorhees College students (traditional, non-traditional, and transfer students)

 
·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3 *MATH 131 pre-req for Physics I
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO130 Gen Bio and lab, or Physical Science 130, or Chem 141—General Chemistry and lab 4
CP120—Career Pathways 1;

CMP 130

2

3

Total 17  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231—Bible as literature or REL 232—Life and Teachings of Jesus or REL 233—Comparative Religion 3  
(GI Elective) 3  
History 133 3  
CP 121—Career Pathways II 2  
Total 14  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
Soc 230-Intro to sociology 3  
Free Electives 3  
GI Elective—(See chart ) 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3 *Pre-req for SPAN 132 or FREN 132
Geo 230 World Geography 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways 2  
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
History 234, or AAS 230 3  
Restricted I—Restrictive Elective 3
SS231-American National Government 3
Span/Fren 132 Spanish II, or French II 3
CP 202 Career Pathways II 2
Total 14  
5th Semester CR Notes
SS331 Social Statistics 3
SS332 Research Methods 3
SocJ333 Criminology 3 Pre-req for
Restricted II Restricted Elective 3
Soc 337 Racial and Ethnic Minorities 3
CP301 Career Pathways  
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
Soc 334 Sociological Theory 3
Soc 335 The Family 3
Restricted III Restrictive Elective 3
Free Elective 3
CP 302 Career Pathways 2
Total 14  
7Th Semester CR Notes
Socj435 Deviant Behavior 3
Soc 434 Social Gerontology 3
Socj 431 Juvenile Delinquency 3
Soc 432 Social Problems 3
Restrictive 4 Restrictive 4 3
CP 401 Career Pathways I 1
Total 16  
8th Semester CR Notes
SS 431 Social Science Internship 3  
SS 433 Ethics in Social Science 3  
Restricted 5 Restrictive 5 3  
SS 440 Senior Capstone Seminar 3  
CP 402 Career Pathways II 2
Total 14  

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human Services

Biology Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Pre-Med
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

 
Program Specific Requirements Biology Pre-Medical Track (Required Courses)
·       A minimum grade of “C” is required in all Biology courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131

·        BIO 150 Biological Science I & Lab

·       PHYS 241 Physics I

·       BIO 151 Biological Science II & Lab

·       CHEM 141 General Chemistry I

·       CHEM 142 General Chemistry II

·       PHYS 242 Physics II

·       MATH 331 Calculus I

·       CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I and Lab

·       CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab

·       PSY 230 General Psychology

·       SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology

·       BIO 462 Biostatistics

·       CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) administers the required Medical College Admission Test® (MCAT®).  The MCAT is a standardized, multiple-choice examination created to help medical school admissions offices assess your problem solving, critical thinking, and knowledge of natural, behavioral, and social science concepts and principles prerequisite to the study of medicine.
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 150 Biological Sciences I 4
FS 120 Freshman Seminar I 2
CHEM 141 General Chemistry 4
Total 18  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
PSY 230 General Psychology 3
CHEM 142 General Chemistry II & Lab 3 *Pre-req CHEM 141
BIO 151 Biological Sciences II 4 *Pre-req BIO 150
FS 121 Freshman Seminar II 2  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
MATH 231 Pre-Calculus I 3  
CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3  
BIO 245 Human Anat & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151
CP 201 Career Pathways 2 *Apply to pre-med summer program (SHDPEP or SC AHEC)

 

Total 16  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SPCH130 OR SPCH231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
MATH 232 Pre-Calculus II 3 *Pre-req MATH 231
SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
Total 18  
5th Semester CR Notes
MATH 331 Calculus I 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232
PHYS 241 Intro to Physics I & Lab 4 *Pre-MATH 231, MATH 232
BIO 341 Genetics & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
CP 301 Career Pathways 2 *Apply for UNC Med Program and apply for   AMCAS fee waiver( for medical school only);
Total 16  
6th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
BIO 442 Microbiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 342 Ecology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
PHYS 242 Intro to Physics II & Lab 4 *Pre-req PHYS 241
CP 302 Career Pathways 2 *Take the MCAT
Total 18  
7Th Semester CR Notes
BIO 441 Cell Biology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151, CHEM 241, CHEM 242
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
BIO 462 Biostatistics 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232, MATH 331
CMP 150 Intro to Computer Science 3
3 *Apply to medical school
Total 15  
8th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241, BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 450 Physiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151, BIO 245, CHEM 241, CHEM 242, BIO 441, BIO 341
*BIO 470 Undergraduate Research 2 *Required for Honors College
CP 402 Career Pathways 2 *Retake MCAT
BIO 320 Molecular Biology and Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, BIO 150, BIO 151
Total 16  
Total Hours 134

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Essential Information

Required Education Medical doctor degree; residency program
Other Requirements State licensure; specialty certification
Job Outlook (2014-2024) 14% for all physicians and surgeons
Average Annual Salary (2015) Varies by field; $192,120 for family and general practice doctors; $258,100 for anesthesiologists*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.

Job Description

Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.

Workplace

Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.

Job Options

M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.

Career Information

From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Salary Information

Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.

A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

 

Career and labor market research tools

See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

 Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link:

https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phonel: (803) 780-1074

Biology Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Pre-Pharmacy
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human Services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

 

 

Program Specific Requirements Biology Pre-Pharmacy Track (Required Courses)
·       A minimum grade of “C” is required in all Biology courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131

·        BIO 150 Biological Science I & Lab

·       PHYS 241 Physics I

·       BIO 151 Biological Science II & Lab

·       CHEM 141 General Chemistry I

·       CHEM 142 General Chemistry II

·       PHYS 242 Physics II

·       MATH 331 Calculus I

·       CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I and Lab

·       CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab

·       PSY 230 General Psychology

·       SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology

·       BIO 462 Biostatistics

·       CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab

·       BIO 245 Human Anatomy and Lab

·       BIO 450 Physiology and Lab

The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy administers the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT). The Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT®) is a specialized test that helps identify qualified applicants to pharmacy colleges. It measures general academic ability and scientific knowledge necessary for the commencement of pharmaceutical education. The PCAT is constructed specifically for colleges of pharmacy
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 150 Biological Sciences I 4
FS 120 Freshman Seminar I 2
CHEM 141 General Chemistry 4
Total 18  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
PSY 230 General Psychology 3
CHEM 142 General Chemistry II & Lab 3 *Pre-req CHEM 141
BIO 151 Biological Sciences II 4 *Pre-req BIO 150
FS 121 Freshman Seminar II 2  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
MATH 231 Pre-Calculus I 3  
CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3  
BIO 245 Human Anat & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151
CP 201 Career Pathways 2 *Apply to summer research program
Total 16  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SPCH130 OR SPCH231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
MATH 232 Pre-Calculus II 3 *Pre-req MATH 231
SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
Total 18  
5th Semester CR Notes
MATH 331 Calculus I 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232
PHYS 241 Intro to Physics I & Lab 4 *Pre-MATH 231, MATH 232
BIO 341 Genetics & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
CP 301 Career Pathways 2 *Apply for summer research program and apply for PharmCAS fee waiver( for medical school only)
Total 16  
6th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
BIO 442 Microbiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 342 Ecology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
PHYS 242 Intro to Physics II & Lab 4 *Pre-req PHYS 241
CP 302 Career Pathways 2 *Take the PCAT
Total 18  
7Th Semester CR Notes
BIO 441 Cell Biology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151, CHEM 241, CHEM 242
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
BIO 462 Biostatistics 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232, MATH 331
CMP 150 Intro to Computer Science 3
3 *Apply to pharmacy school
Total 15  
8th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241, BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 450 Physiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151, BIO 245, CHEM 241, CHEM 242, BIO 441, BIO 341
*BIO 470 Undergraduate Research 2 *Required for Honors College
CP 402 Career Pathways 2 *Retake PCAT
BIO 320 Molecular Biology and Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, BIO 150, BIO 151
Total 16  
Total Hours 134

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Essential Information

Required Education Medical doctor degree; residency program
Other Requirements State licensure; specialty certification
Job Outlook (2014-2024) 14% for all physicians and surgeons
Average Annual Salary (2015) Varies by field; $192,120 for family and general practice doctors; $258,100 for anesthesiologists*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.

Job Description

Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.

Workplace

Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.

Job Options

M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.

Career Information

From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Salary Information

Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.

A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

 

Career and labor market research tools

See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

 

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link:

https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074

Biology Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Pre-Dental
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human Services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

 
Program Specific Requirements Biology Pre-Dental (Required Courses)
·       A minimum grade of “C” is required in all Biology courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131

·        BIO 150 Biological Science I & Lab

·       PHYS 241 Physics I

·       BIO 151 Biological Science II & Lab

·       CHEM 141 General Chemistry I

·       CHEM 142 General Chemistry II

·       PHYS 242 Physics II

·       MATH 331 Calculus I

·       CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I and Lab

·       CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab

·       PSY 230 General Psychology

·       SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology

·       BIO 462 Biostatistics

·       CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab

The American Dental Education Association administers the Dental Admission Test (DAT). The DAT is a dental education admission test designed to provide dental education programs with a means to assess program applicants’ potential for success. It is administered year-round by Prometric test centers in the United States, its territories (including Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and Canada. applicants to pharmacy colleges. All applicants must take the DAT, which includes the following six areas, Biology, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Reading Comprehension, Perceptual Ability, and Quantitative Reasoning.
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 150 Biological Sciences I 4
FS 120 Freshman Seminar I 2
CHEM 141 General Chemistry 4
Total 18  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
PSY 230 General Psychology 3
CHEM 142 General Chemistry II & Lab 3 *Pre-req CHEM 141
BIO 151 Biological Sciences II 4 *Pre-req BIO 150
FS 121 Freshman Seminar II 2  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
MATH 231 Pre-Calculus I 3  
CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3  
BIO 245 Human Anat & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151
CP 201 Career Pathways 2 *Apply to pre-med summer program (SHDPEP or SC AHEC)
Total 16  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SPCH130 OR SPCH231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
MATH 232 Pre-Calculus II 3 *Pre-req MATH 231
SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
Total 18  
5th Semester CR Notes
MATH 331 Calculus I 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232
PHYS 241 Intro to Physics I & Lab 4 *Pre-MATH 231, MATH 232
BIO 341 Genetics & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
CP 301 Career Pathways 2 *Apply for UNC Med Program and apply for   AADSAS fee waiver (dental school only);
Total 16  
6th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
BIO 442 Microbiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 342 Ecology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
PHYS 242 Intro to Physics II & Lab 4 *Pre-req PHYS 241
CP 302 Career Pathways 2 *Take the DAT
Total 18  
7Th Semester CR Notes
BIO 441 Cell Biology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151, CHEM 241, CHEM 242
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
BIO 462 Biostatistics 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232, MATH 331
CMP 150 Intro to Computer Science 3
3 *Apply to dental school
Total 15  
8th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241, BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 450 Physiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151, BIO 245, CHEM 241, CHEM 242, BIO 441, BIO 341
*BIO 470 Undergraduate Research 2 *Required for Honors College
CP 402 Career Pathways 2 *Retake DAT
BIO 320 Molecular Biology and Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, BIO 150, BIO 151
Total 16  
Total Hours 134

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Essential Information

Required Education Medical doctor degree; residency program
Other Requirements State licensure; specialty certification
Job Outlook (2014-2024) 14% for all physicians and surgeons
Average Annual Salary (2015) Varies by field; $192,120 for family and general practice doctors; $258,100 for anesthesiologists*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.

Job Description

Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.

Workplace

Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.

Job Options

M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.

Career Information

From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Salary Information

Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.

A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

 

Career and labor market research tools

See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

 Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link:

https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074

Biology Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Pre-Physical Therapy
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human Services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

 
Program Specific Requirements Biology Pre-Physical Therapy (Required Courses)
·       A minimum grade of “C” is required in all Biology courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131

·        BIO 150 Biological Science I & Lab

·       PHYS 241 Physics I

·       BIO 151 Biological Science II & Lab

·       CHEM 141 General Chemistry I

·       CHEM 142 General Chemistry II

·       PHYS 242 Physics II

·       MATH 331 Calculus I

·       CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I and Lab

·       CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab

·       PSY 230 General Psychology

·       SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology

·       BIO 462 Biostatistics

·       CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) administers the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS).  PTCAS allows applicants to use a single application and one set of materials to apply to multiple DPT programs.
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 150 Biological Sciences I 4
FS 120 Freshman Seminar I 2
CHEM 141 General Chemistry 4
Total 18  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
PSY 230 General Psychology 3
CHEM 142 General Chemistry II & Lab 3 *Pre-req CHEM 141
BIO 151 Biological Sciences II 4 *Pre-req BIO 150
FS 121 Freshman Seminar II 2 Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
MATH 231 Pre-Calculus I 3  
CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3  
BIO 245 Human Anat & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151
CP 201 Career Pathways 2 *Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 16  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SPCH130 OR SPCH231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
MATH 232 Pre-Calculus II 3 *Pre-req MATH 231
SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
Total 18  
5th Semester CR Notes
MATH 331 Calculus I 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232
PHYS 241 Intro to Physics I & Lab 4 *Pre-MATH 231, MATH 232
BIO 341 Genetics & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
CP 301 Career Pathways 2 *Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)and apply for PTCAS fee waiver (physical therapy only)
Total 16  
6th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
BIO 442 Microbiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 342 Ecology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
PHYS 242 Intro to Physics II & Lab 4 *Pre-req PHYS 241
CP 302 Career Pathways 2 *Take the GRE and Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 18  
7Th Semester CR Notes
BIO 441 Cell Biology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151, CHEM 241, CHEM 242
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
BIO 462 Biostatistics 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232, MATH 331
CMP 150 Intro to Computer Science 3
3 *Apply to physical therapy school and Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 15  
8th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241, BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 450 Physiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151, BIO 245, CHEM 241, CHEM 242, BIO 441, BIO 341
*BIO 470 Undergraduate Research 2 *Required for Honors College
CP 402 Career Pathways 2 *Retake GRE and Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
BIO 320 Molecular Biology and Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, BIO 150, BIO 151
Total 16  
Total Hours 134

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Essential Information

Required Education Medical doctor degree; residency program
Other Requirements State licensure; specialty certification
Job Outlook (2014-2024) 14% for all physicians and surgeons
Average Annual Salary (2015) Varies by field; $192,120 for family and general practice doctors; $258,100 for anesthesiologists*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.

Job Description

Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.

Workplace

Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.

Job Options

M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.

Career Information

From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Salary Information

Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.

A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

Career and labor market research tools

See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link:

https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phonel: (803) 780-1074

Sports Management Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Coaching Track
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

 
Program Specific Coaching Track (Required Courses)
·       English Proficiency Exam (EPE)

  • A minimum grade of “C” is required in all sports management courses.
  • A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131
·       PSY 230 Gen Psychology

·       REC 222 Team Sports

·       REC 321 Recreational Games

SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab Physical Science General Chemistry I & Lab 4
FS 120 Freshman Seminar I 2
Total 14  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3  
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3  
FS 121 Freshman Seminar II 2  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
SM 231 Intro to Sports Mgmt 3  
SPCH130 OR SPCH231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3  
PSY 230 Gen Psychology 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SM 234 Sports Events Planning 3  
SM 232 Role of Sports in Society 3
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
REC 222 Team Sports 2
Free Elective 3
Total 16  
5th Semester CR Notes
SM 331 Sprts Mrktg & Prom 3
SM 333 Facil Mgmt & Design 3
MGT 333 Human Res Mgmt 3 *Pre-req MGT 331
SS 331 Social Statistics 3 *Pre-req SOC 230
CP 301 Career Pathways 2
MGT 331 Princ of Mgmt 3 *Pre-req Junior Status
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
MGT 332 Organiz Behavior 3 *Pre-req MGT 331
BA 338 Business Law 3 *Pre-req MGT 331
SM 332 Sprts Mgmt Practicm 3
SM 334 Fin & Econ In Sports 3 *Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Prospective Graduate Students
Free Elective 3
CP 302 Career Pathways 2
Total 17  
7Th Semester CR Notes
REC 321 Recreational Games 3
SM 431 Legal Iss in Sprts Sttngs 3
SM 433 Ethics & Sport Mgmt 3
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
Free Elective 3
Total 14  
8th Semester CR Notes
SM 440 Internship in SM 12  
CP 402 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
Total Hours 123

Questions and Notes

Not enough courses to make a track, contingent upon the new courses listed below being offered

Principles and Problems of Coaching (offered in summer only) 3
Motor Learning and Performance 2
Coaching Education Administration 3
Liability in Sport 3
Practicum Coaching Youth Sport 3
One of the following Techniques of Coaching classes:
Techniques of Coaching Lacrosse
Techniques of Coaching: Swimming 2
Techniques of Coaching: Track 2
Techniques of Coaching: Soccer 2
Techniques of Coaching: Basketball 2
Techniques of Coaching: Football 2
Techniques of Coaching: Baseball 2
Techniques of Coaching: Volleyball 2

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Sports Coaching and Instructors Career Track Essential Job Information

The specific job requirements of sports instructors and coaches varies according to the type of sport and athletes involved. For example, an instructor teaching advanced skiing at a resort in Utah will have different duties and responsibilities than an instructor teaching beginning swimming at a municipal pool. Nevertheless, all instructors and coaches are teachers. They must be very knowledgeable about rules and strategies for their respective sports. They must also have an effective teaching method that reinforces correct techniques and procedures so their students or players will be able to gain from that valuable knowledge. Also, instructors and coaches need to be aware of and open to new procedures and techniques. Many attend clinics or seminars to learn more about their sport or even how to teach more effectively. Many are also members of professional organizations that deal exclusively with their sport.

Safety is a primary concern for all coaches and instructors. Coaches and instructors make sure their students have the right equipment and know its correct use. A major component of safety is helping students feel comfortable and confident with their abilities. This entails teaching the proper stances, techniques, and movements of a game, instructing students on basic rules, and answering any questions.

While instructors may tutor students individually or in small groups, a coach works with all the members of a team. Both use lectures and demonstrations to show students the proper skills, and both point out students’ mistakes or deficiencies.

Motivation is another key element in sports instruction. Almost all sports require stamina, and most coaches will tell you that psychological preparation is every bit as important as physical training.

Coaches and instructors also have administrative responsibilities. College coaches actively recruit new players to join their team. Professional coaches attend team meetings with owners and general managers to determine which players they will draft the next season. Sports instructors at health and athletic clubs schedule classes, lessons, and contests.

Sports Coaching and Instructor Career Requirements

Training and educational requirements vary, depending on the specific sport and the ability level of students being instructed. Most coaches who are associated with schools have bachelor’s degrees. Many middle and high school coaches are also teachers within the school. Most instructors need to combine several years of successful experience in a particular sport with some educational background, preferably in teaching. A college degree is becoming more important as part of an instructor’s background.

High School

To prepare for college courses, high school students should take courses that teach human physiology. Biology, health, and exercise classes would all be helpful. Courses in English and speech are also important to improve or develop communication skills.

There is no substitute for developing expertise in a sport. If you can play the sport well and effectively explain to other people how they might play, you will most likely be able to get a job as a sports instructor. The most significant source of training for this occupation is gained while on the job.

Postsecondary Training

Postsecondary training in this field varies greatly. College and professional coaches often attended college as athletes, while others attended college and received their degrees without playing a sport. If you are interested in becoming a high school coach, you will need a college degree because you will most likely be teaching as well as coaching. At the high school level, coaches spend their days teaching everything from physical education to English to mathematics, and so the college courses these coaches take vary greatly. Coaches of some youth league sports may not need a postsecondary degree, but they must have a solid understanding of their sport and of injury prevention.

Certification or Licensing

Many facilities require sports instructors to be certified. Information on certification is available from any organization that deals with the specific sport in which one might be interested.

Since most high school coaches also work as teachers, those interested in this job should plan to obtain teacher certification in their state.

Other Requirements

Coaches have to be experts in their sport. They must have complete knowledge of the rules and strategies of the game, so that they can creatively design effective plays and techniques for their athletes. But the requirements for this job do not end here. Good coaches are able to communicate their extensive knowledge to the athletes in a way that not only instructs the athletes, but also inspires them to perform to their fullest potential. Therefore, coaches are also teachers.

“I think I’m good at my job because I love working with people and because I’m disciplined in everything I do,” says Dawn Shannahan, former assistant girls’ basketball and track coach at Leyden High School in Franklin Park, Illinois. Discipline is important for athletes, as they must practice plays and techniques over and over again. Coaches who cannot demonstrate and encourage this type of discipline will have difficulty helping their athletes improve. Shannahan adds, “I’ve seen coaches who are really knowledgeable about their sport but who aren’t patient enough to allow for mistakes or for learning.” Patience can make all the difference between an effective coach and one who is unsuccessful.

Similarly, Shannahan says, “A coach shouldn’t be a pessimist. The team could be losing by a lot, but you have to stay optimistic and encourage the players.” Coaches must be able to work under pressure, guiding teams through games and tournaments that carry great personal and possibly financial stakes for everyone involved.

Exploring Sport Coaching and Instructors Careers

Try to gain as much experience as possible in all sports and a specific sport in particular. It is never too early to start. High school and college offer great opportunities to participate in sporting events either as a player, manager, trainer, or in intramural leagues.

Most communities have sports programs such as Little League baseball or track and field meets sponsored by the recreation commission. Get involved by volunteering as a coach, umpire, or starter.

Talking with sports instructors already working in the field is also a good way to discover specific job information and find out about career opportunities.

Employers

Besides working in high schools, coaches are hired by colleges and universities, professional sports teams, individual athletes such as tennis players, and by youth leagues, summer camps, and recreation centers.

Starting Out

People with expertise in a particular sport, who are interested in becoming an instructor, should apply directly to the appropriate facility. Sometimes a facility will provide training.

For those interested in coaching, many colleges offer positions to graduate assistant coaches. Graduate assistant coaches are recently graduated players who are interested in becoming coaches. They receive a stipend and gain valuable coaching experience.

 

Advancement

Advancement opportunities for both instructors and coaches depend on the individual’s skills, willingness to learn, and work ethic. A sports coach’s / instructor’s success can be measured by caliber of play and number of students. Successful instructors may become well known enough to open their own schools or camps, write books, or produce how-to videos.

Some would argue that a high percentage of wins is the only criteria for success for professional coaches. However, coaches in the scholastic ranks have other responsibilities and other factors that measure success; for example, high school and college coaches must make sure their players are getting good grades. All coaches must try to produce a team that competes in a sportsmanlike fashion regardless of whether they win or lose.

Successful coaches are often hired by larger schools. High school coaches may advance to become college coaches, and the most successful college coaches often are given the opportunity to coach professional teams. Former players sometimes land assistant or head coaching positions.

Earnings

Earnings for sports instructors and coaches vary considerably depending on the sport and the person or team being coached. The coach of a Wimbledon champion commands much more money per hour than the swimming instructor for the tadpole class at the municipal pool.

The U.S. Department of Labor reports that the median earnings for sports coaches and instructors were $25,990 in 2005. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $13,650, while the highest 10 percent earned more than $56,400. Sports instructors and coaches who worked at colleges and universities earned a median annual salary of $41,910 in 2005, while those employed by elementary and secondary schools earned $27,380.

Much of the work is part time, and part-time employees generally do not receive paid vacations, sick days, or health insurance. Instructors who teach group classes for beginners through park districts or at city recreation centers can expect to earn around $6 per hour. An hour long individual lesson through a golf course or tennis club averages $75. Many times, coaches for children’s teams work as volunteers.

Many sports instructors work in camps teaching swimming, archery, sailing and other activities. These instructors generally earn between $1,000 and $2,500, plus room and board, for a summer session.

Full-time fitness instructors at gyms or health clubs can expect to earn between $17,380 and $40,030 per year, with a median salary of $25,470. Instructors with many years of experience and a college degree have the highest earning potential.

Most coaches who work at the high school level or below also teach within the school district. Besides their teaching salary and coaching fee—either a flat rate or a percentage of their annual salary—school coaches receive a benefits package that includes paid vacations and health insurance.

College head football coaches generally earn an average of $75,000, although top coaches can earn as much as $2 million per year. Head coaches of men’s college basketball teams’ average about $70,000 annually, while coaches of women’s teams average considerable less at $42,000 a year. Many larger universities pay more. Coaches for professional teams often earn between $125,000 and $500,000. Some top coaches can command million-dollar- salaries. Many popular coaches augment their salaries with personal appearances and endorsements.

Work Environment

An instructor or coach may work indoors, in a gym or health club, or outdoors, perhaps at a swimming pool. Much of the work is part time. Full-time sports instructors generally work between 35 and 40 hours per week.

During the season when their teams compete, coaches can work 16 hours each day, five or six days each week. It is not unusual for coaches or instructors to work evenings or weekends. Instructors work then because that is when their adult students are available for instruction. Coaches work nights and weekends because those are the times their teams compete.

One significant drawback to this job is the lack of job security. A club may hire a new instructor on very little notice, or may cancel a scheduled class for lack of interest. Athletic teams routinely fire coaches after losing seasons.

Sports instructors and coaches should enjoy working with a wide variety of people. They should be able to communicate clearly and possess good leadership skills to effectively teach complex skills. They can take pride in the knowledge that they have helped their students or their players reach new heights of achievement and training.

Sports Instructor and Coach Career Outlook

Americans’ interest in health, physical fitness, and body image continues to send people to gyms and playing fields. This fitness boom has created strong employment opportunities for many people in sports-related occupations.

Health clubs, community centers, parks and recreational facilities, and private business now employ sports instructors who teach everything from tennis and golf to scuba diving.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this occupation will grow about as fast as the average through 2014. Job opportunities will be best in high schools and in amateur athletic leagues. Health clubs, adult education programs, and private industry will require competent, dedicated instructors. Those with the most training, education, and experience will have the best chance for employment.

The creation of new professional leagues, as well as the expansion of current leagues will open some new employment opportunities for professional coaches, but competition for these jobs will be very intense. There will also be openings as other coaches retire, or are terminated. However, there is very little job security in coaching, unless a coach can consistently produce a winning team.

Career Information References

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link:

https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074

Additional Career Service Links:

http://www.ncaa.org/about/coaching-associations

http://www.sportscareersinstitute.com/sports-jobs-sites.html

https://www.teamworkonline.com/

https://www.sportscareerfinder.com/members/sports-links/k-12-sports-resources/

http://www.sportscareers.com/

https://www.jobsinsports.com/

https://www.workinsports.com/

Biology Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Pre-Physical Therapy
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human Services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

 
Program Specific Requirements Biology Pre-Physical Therapy (Required Courses)
·       A minimum grade of “C” is required in all Biology courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131

·        BIO 150 Biological Science I & Lab

·       PHYS 241 Physics I

·       BIO 151 Biological Science II & Lab

·       CHEM 141 General Chemistry I

·       CHEM 142 General Chemistry II

·       PHYS 242 Physics II

·       MATH 331 Calculus I

·       CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I and Lab

·       CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab

·       PSY 230 General Psychology

·       SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology

·       BIO 462 Biostatistics

·       CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) administers the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS).  PTCAS allows applicants to use a single application and one set of materials to apply to multiple DPT programs.
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 150 Biological Sciences I 4
FS 120 Freshman Seminar I 2
CHEM 141 General Chemistry 4
Total 18  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
PSY 230 General Psychology 3
CHEM 142 General Chemistry II & Lab 3 *Pre-req CHEM 141
BIO 151 Biological Sciences II 4 *Pre-req BIO 150
FS 121 Freshman Seminar II 2 Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
MATH 231 Pre-Calculus I 3  
CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3  
BIO 245 Human Anat & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151
CP 201 Career Pathways 2 *Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 16  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SPCH130 OR SPCH231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
MATH 232 Pre-Calculus II 3 *Pre-req MATH 231
SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3
Total 18  
5th Semester CR Notes
MATH 331 Calculus I 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232
PHYS 241 Intro to Physics I & Lab 4 *Pre-MATH 231, MATH 232
BIO 341 Genetics & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3
CP 301 Career Pathways 2 *Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)and apply for PTCAS fee waiver (physical therapy only)
Total 16  
6th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
BIO 442 Microbiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 342 Ecology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
PHYS 242 Intro to Physics II & Lab 4 *Pre-req PHYS 241
CP 302 Career Pathways 2 *Take the GRE and Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 18  
7Th Semester CR Notes
BIO 441 Cell Biology & Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151, CHEM 241, CHEM 242
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
BIO 462 Biostatistics 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232, MATH 331
CMP 150 Intro to Computer Science 3
3 *Apply to physical therapy school and Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
Total 15  
8th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241, BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 450 Physiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151, BIO 245, CHEM 241, CHEM 242, BIO 441, BIO 341
*BIO 470 Undergraduate Research 2 *Required for Honors College
CP 402 Career Pathways 2 *Retake GRE and Apply to VC PIP VC PIP (80-300 total hours of observation required)
BIO 320 Molecular Biology and Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, BIO 150, BIO 151
Total 16  
Total Hours 134

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Essential Information

Required Education Medical doctor degree; residency program
Other Requirements State licensure; specialty certification
Job Outlook (2014-2024) 14% for all physicians and surgeons
Average Annual Salary (2015) Varies by field; $192,120 for family and general practice doctors; $258,100 for anesthesiologists*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.

Job Description

Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.

Workplace

Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.

Job Options

M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.

Career Information

From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Salary Information

Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.

A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

 

Career and labor market research tools

See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

 

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link:

https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phonel: (803) 780-1074

Sports Management Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Sports Psychology
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program. Courses required for the Sports Management Program with a concentration/track in Sports Psychology are highlighted in green.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

 
Program Specific Sports Psychology Track (Required Courses)
·       A minimum grade of “C” is required in all sports management courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131

·       PSY 230 Gen Psychology

·       SM 234 Sports Events Planning

·       HSC 100 Nutrition for Public Health

·       SM 331 Sprts Mrktg & Prom

·       MGT 333 Human Res Mgmt

·       BIO 442 Human Physiology & Lab

·       SM 431 Legal Iss in Sprts Sttngs

·       SM 433 Ethics & Sport Mgmt

·       BIO 245 Human Anatomy & Lab

SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
BIO 130 or PHYS 130 or CHEM 141 General Bio & Lab Physical Science General Chemistry I & Lab 4
FS 120 Freshman Seminar I 2
Total 14  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
REL 231 or REL 232 or REL 233 The Bible as Literature or Life and Teachings of Jesus or Comparative Religion 3  
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3  
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Intro to African American Studies 3  
CMP130 Computer Concepts 3  
FS 121 Freshman Seminar II 2  
Total 17  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
SM 231 Intro to Sports Mgmt 3  
SPCH130 OR SPCH231 Intro to Communication or Public Speaking 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Elementary Spanish I or Elementary French I 3  
PSY 230 Gen Psychology 3  
CP 201 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
4th Semester CR. Notes
SM 234 Sports Events Planning 3  
SM 232 Role of Sports in Society 3
GI ELECTIVE (see chart below major) Global and Intercultural Elective 3
CP 202 Career Pathways 2
REC 222 Team Sports 2
HSC 100 Nutrition for Public Health 3
Total 16  
5th Semester CR Notes
SM 331 Sprts Mrktg & Prom 3
SM 333 Facil Mgmt & Design 3
MGT 333 Human Res Mgmt 3 *Pre-req MGT 331
SS 331 Social Statistics 3 *Pre-req SOC 230
CP 301 Career Pathways 2
MGT 331 Princ of Mgmt 3 *Pre-req Junior Status
Total 17  
6th Semester CR Notes
MGT 332 Organiz Behavior 3 *Pre-req MGT 331
BA 338 Business Law 3 *Pre-req MGT 331
SM 332 Sprts Mgmt Practicm 3
SM 334 Fin & Econ In Sports 3 *Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Prospective Graduate Students
BIO 442 Human Physiology & Lab 3
CP 302 Career Pathways 2
Total 17  
7Th Semester CR Notes
REC 321 Recreational Games 3
SM 431 Legal Iss in Sprts Sttngs 3
SM 433 Ethics & Sport Mgmt 3
CP 401 Career Pathways 2
BIO 245 Human Anatomy & Lab 4
Total 15  
8th Semester CR Notes
SM 440 Internship in SM 12  
CP 402 Career Pathways 2  
Total 14  
Total Hours 124

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

 

Sport Psychology Career Track Essential Job Information

Sports psychology is a combination of several disciplines within psychology and sports science. Aspiring graduates can take various pathways in their education as well as in their career. Employment opportunities in sports psychology may involve counseling/therapy, teaching, coaching, research, and others. While a bachelor’s degree in sports psychology (or a double major in psychology and a sports-related subject) may open some employment opportunities, most entry-level and higher jobs in this field require a graduate degree.

A clinical and sport psychologist studies the interaction between psychological factors and performance in sports. Jess, the psychologist in the video works with athletes who have eating disorders.

Career Titles Clinical or Applied Sports Psychologist
Education Requirements Doctoral degree required for most positions
Licensure & Certification Either required, depending on the state
Projected Job Growth (2014-2024) 19%*
Median Salary (2015) $94,590 for all psychologists*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

Career Options

Clinical Sports Psychologist

Clinical Sports Psychologists typically counsel athletes facing personal and career crises such as anxiety, performance issues, behavior modification and mental responses to physical injuries.

Applied Sports Psychologist

Applied Sports Psychologists instruct individual athletes and sports teams on the various methods of mental conditioning, including visualization, concentration and relaxation techniques. Many sports psychologists work onsite with sports teams alongside coaches, trainers and managers. Others practice independently and perform consulting services on an as-needed basis.

Career Information

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median salary for psychologists, all other, including sports psychologists, is $94,590 per year in May 2015. The employment rate for all psychologists is expected to increase by 19% between 2014 and 2024, which is actually the national average for all careers (www.bls.gov).

Salaries vary based on the psychologist’s area of specialization and experience, the employing organization and the amount of advanced training received. Experienced psychologists working for professional sports teams or professional athletes may earn six-figure salaries, while those working in educational or research settings receive more modest salaries.

 Jobs in the field of sports psychology:

  • Applied Sports Psychologist. …
  • Clinical Sports Psychologist. …
  • Sports Rehabilitation Therapist. …
  • Sports Research Specialist. …
  • University Team Coach. …
  • Professional Team Coach. …
  • Sports Psychology Professor. …
  • High School Teacher.

The BLS reports that the job outlook is best for sports psychologists with a doctoral degree in their specialty. Positions for potential psychologists with master’s degrees are limited and candidates may face intense competition for the available jobs. Sports psychologists with master’s degrees may expect to work as assistant counselors or in research positions, directly supervised by licensed psychologists. Time spent volunteering with sports teams or interning under the supervision of sport and exercise psychology professionals may also be helpful in obtaining full-time positions.

Education Requirements

Entry-level positions for licensed sports psychologists typically require a master’s or doctorate degree in clinical psychology, sports psychology or counseling. Very few schools currently offer full sports and exercise psychology programs at the undergraduate or graduate level. Undergraduate students may consider pursuing double majors in psychology and exercise science, or a major in one discipline with a minor in the second.

Graduate and post-graduate students typically complete advanced coursework in exercise science, kinesiology and clinical psychology. A one-year internship through a program approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) may be an additional requirement for graduation. Continuing education and training is available through several professional organizations, including the APA and the Association for Applied Sport Psychology, once state licensing or certification as a psychologist is obtained.

To summarize, sports psychologists combine a passion for psychology and sports to conduct research and apply findings to the mental and emotional betterment of athletes. These professionals require extensive knowledge and training that usually results in the acquisition of a doctoral degree.

Career Links / References

  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • Explore Careers, Labor Market Information, Government of Canada
  • Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP)

http://www.ncaa.org/about/coaching-associations

http://www.sportscareersinstitute.com/sports-jobs-sites.html

https://www.teamworkonline.com/

https://www.sportscareerfinder.com/members/sports-links/k-12-sports-resources/

http://www.sportscareers.com/

https://www.jobsinsports.com/

https://www.workinsports.com/

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link:

https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074

Professional Psychology Associations

Sport Associations

  • British Olympic Association
  • International Olympic Committee
  • National Collegiate Athletics Association
  • National Alliance for Youth Sports
  • Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association
  • North American Society for Sport Management
Public Health Degree Requirements
Student Name: Track/Concentration: Pre-Med
Use this Program Map to choose courses with your advisor and track your progress towards milestones and completion of program.
Department Information Faculty Advisor Information
Zhabiz Golkar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human services

Division of Academic Affairs

Councilor, South Carolina Academy of Sciences 

Office: 803 780 1060

zgolkar.voorhees.edu 

Kendall Williams, DrPH

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human Services

Assistant Professor of Public Health

Alan M. Voorhees Science Center, Room 109

Office: (803) 780-1054

Fax: (803) 780-4774

Program Specific Pre-Medical Track (Required Courses)
·       English Proficiency Exam (EPE)

·       A minimum grade of “C” is required in all Public Health courses.

·       A minimum grade of “C”or better must be earned in ENG 131 and ENG 132, MATH 121 OR MATH 131.

·       BIO 150 Biological Science I & Lab

·       PHYS 241 Physics I

  • BIO 151 Biological Science II & Lab

·       CHEM 141 General Chemistry I

·       CHEM 142 General Chemistry II

·       PHYS 242 Physics II

·       MATH 331 Calculus I

·       CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I and Lab

·       CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab

  • PSY 230 General Psychology

·       SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology

·       BIO 440 Epidemiology

·       BIO 462 Biostatistics

·       CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab

The Required Pre-Medical Track Courses help students prepare for the Medical College Admission Test® (MCAT®), developed which is administered by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The MCAT is a standardized, multiple-choice examination created to help medical school admissions offices assess your problem solving, critical thinking, and knowledge of natural, behavioral, and social science concepts and principles prerequisite to the study of medicine.
SEMESTER-BY-SEMESTER PROGRAM PLAN FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS

 

1st Semester CR. Notes
ENG 131 Ideas, & Their Expr I 3
MATH 121 or MATH 131 General Math, College Algebra 3
PE 120 or HSC 231 Intro to Physical Ed. or Health Education 2
HSC 101 Intro to Public Health 3
CP 120ST Career Pathways 2
CMP 130 Computer Concepts 3
Total 16  
2nd Semester CR Notes
ENG 132 Ideas & Their Expr II 3  
SPAN 131 or FREN 131 Spanish 1 OR Elem French I 3  
BIO 150 Biological Science I & Lab 4
HSC 100 Nutrition for Pub Health 3  
CP 122ST Career Pathways 2  
Total 15  
3rd Semester CR. Notes
MATH 231 Pre-Calculus I 3  
CP 201 ST Career Pathways I 2  
PHYS 241 Physics I 4 *Pre-MATH 231, MATH 232
BIO 151 Biological Science II & Lab 4 *Pre req BIO 150
CHEM 141 General Chemistry I 4 *Apply to pre-med summer program (SHDPEP or SC AHEC)
Total 17  
4th Semester CR. Notes
CHEM 142 General Chemistry II 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141
MATH 232 Pre-Calculus II 3 *Pre-req MATH 231
CP 202 Career Pathways II 2
HIST 234 or AAS 230 American and African American History I or Introduction to African American Studies 3
PHYS 242 Physics II 4 *Pre-req PHYS 241
Total 16  
5th Semester CR Notes
BIO 245 Human Anatomy and Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151
MATH 331 Calculus I 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232
BIO 440 Epidemiology 4 *Pre-req MATH 231
CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142
BIO 462 Biostatistics 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, MATH 232, MATH 331
CP 301 ST Career Pathways I 2 *Apply for UNC Med Program and apply for   AMCAS fee waiver (for medical school only)
Total 20  
6th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241
PSY 230 General Psychology 3
SOC 230 Introduction to Sociology 3
HSC XXX Global Health 3 Pre-req HSC 101; BIO 440
CP 302 ST Career Pathways II 2 *Take the MCAT
Total 15  
7Th Semester CR Notes
BIO 450 Physiology and Lab 4 *Pre-req BIO 150, BIO 151, BIO 245, CHEM 241, CHEM 242, BIO 441, BIO 341
HSC 431 Chronic and Communicable Diseases 3 *Pre-req MATH 231, BIO 440
GI Elective (See Chart) Global and Intercultural Elective 3
CP 401 ST Career Pathways I (Sr.) 2 *Apply to medical school
Total 12  
8th Semester CR Notes
CHEM 440 Biochemistry & Lab 4 *Pre-req CHEM 141, CHEM 142, CHEM 241, BIO 150, BIO 151
BIO 450 Physiology & Lab 4 *Pre-req  BIO 150, BIO 151, BIO 245, CHEM 241, CHEM 242, BIO 441, BIO 341
CP 402 ST Career Pathways (Sr.) 2 *Retake MCAT
REL 231 The Bible as Literature or

REL 232 Life and Teachings of Jesus or

REL 233 Comparative Training & Lab

3
Total 13  
Total Hours 124

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.

Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.

Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.

Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.

Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.

Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.

Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.

Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Essential Information

Required Education Medical doctor degree; residency program
Other Requirements State licensure; specialty certification
Job Outlook (2014-2024) 14% for all physicians and surgeons
Average Annual Salary (2015) Varies by field; $192,120 for family and general practice doctors; $258,100 for anesthesiologists*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.

Job Description

Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.

Workplace

Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.

Job Options

M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.

Career Information

From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Salary Information

Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.

A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

Career and labor market research tools

See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.

Career Services Link: https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees

Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu

Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074

Voorhees College Career Guide

Students Spotlight

Student 1

Student 2

Student 3

Contact Us

Contact Career Planning and Placement

Lealather Mayers, III M.Ed.

Director of Career Planning and Placement

Phone: (803) 780-1075

Fax: (803) 780-4643

lmayers@voorhees.edu

P.O. Box 678

Denmark, SC 29042

www.voorhees.com

Career Pathways Initiative